Services in UK

Alcohol Concern Alcohol and Families Website 
The website is dedicated to supporting professionals working with children and their parents in the health, education and social sector in understanding and working with the issues involved in parental alcohol misuse. Toolkits for different professional groups are available.  
http://www.alcoholandfamilies.org.uk  

MHRDU Toolkit
The MHRDU at Bath, supported by a grant from the AERC, developed a Toolkit to support those wishing to establish services for children and families affected by alcohol misuse. See http://www.bath.ac.uk/mhrdu/Toolkit

Family Alcohol Service
A collaboration between the NSPCC and ARP in London (Alcohol Recovery Project) led to the establishment of the Family Alcohol Service in North London, the first such specific family service in the UK. The service provides therapeutic and family support services to families and aims to bridge the gap between adult and childrens services by offering support to the whole family through one project. A published paper by Taylor and colleagues, based on data from the service, discusses issues of engagement for these families.

Families Plus
Families Plus is part of Action on Addiction and offers a range of specifically tailored services to family members and children. This includes M-PACT, an intervention programme for whole families living with substance misuse. See http://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk/family_support/  

Turning Point – Base Camp
Turning Point is the UK’s leading social care organisation. Following the publication of ‘Bottling it Up’ in 2006, a report which focused on the impact of parental alcohol misuse on children, Turning Point set up its Base Camp project in 2007 in three of its sites (Manchester, Wakefield and Barnet in London) to offer specific services to children and their parents.

NACOA
NACOA UK is the National Association for the Children of Alcoholics. It offers a range of services, including advice and support to children, supporting professionals in their work, conducting research and raising the UK profile of this group of children. See http://www.nacoa.org.uk  

Option 2
Option 2, based on a US approach to supporting families, and established first in Wales in the UK, is a specialist intervention model for working with families in crisis. Option 2 is a solution focussed and goal oriented model of intervention. It focuses on exploring people’s strengths and values, using them to develop motivation and set achievable measurable goals. The original Option 2 project won the Community Care award for child protection in 2000. Several sister projects have now been set up across England (including Sheffield, Middlesborough, Newcastle and Bristol). The Option 2 model is described in Mark Hamer’s publication called ‘Preventing Breakdown’. See http://www.option2.org/index.html

Addaction - Breaking the Cycle
Addaction, one of the UK’s leading addiction treatment organisations, has responded to recent Government agendas by establishing a range of services which aim to offer more holistic support to substance misusing clients and their families. Running in four sites (Derby, two sites in Cumbria and London), with funding from Zurich Community Trust for three of those sites, Breaking the Cycle offers whole family support to break the generational cycle of harm. See http://www.addaction.org.uk/OurworkBTC.html  

Family Drug and Alcohol Court Based on a successful American model, the UK’s first Family Drug and Alcohol Court opened in London in early 2008. The aim of the Court is to work with addicted parents to overcome their problems so that they can keep their children and increase the numbers of families who can stay together. See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7212423.stm  

Getting Our Priorities Right (Scotland)
Published by the Scottish Government, ‘Getting our Priorities Right’ is a series of good practice guidance for working with children and families affected by substance misuse.
See http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/02/16469/18705  

Resilience guidelines In the light of growing interest in the phenomenon of resilience and how it might be applied to children and families living with substance misuse, and the impact on the development of services, some generic guidelines on resilience are useful resources. Examples are:
1. T Newman (2004). What works in building resilience? Barnardos.
2. R Gilligan (2000). Promoting resilience: A resource guide on working with children in the care system. London; BAAF.
3. SCIE Resource Guide 4 – Promoting resilience in fostered children and young people.